CAD to learn for aerospace or mechanical


#21

Yeah. Tbh tho the integrated cloud works really well. Struggles a bit with big assemblies sometimes but overall it makes it really easy to make your cad more mobile


#22

You should try SpaceClaim. If you need collaboration and versioning, try YaPdm.


#23

To me, for any ME/Aero engineer, knowledge of what to do with geometry is more important than to have a CAD label in your hat.

I worked for the last 43 yrs in Aerospace, mostly in the US. I saw the whole evolution from drawing board (where I was educated) to computer created geometry from the very beginning. From the start, I concentrated in Analytical work of vehicles, so I used FEA and CAD to that degree, i.e. for geometry creation mostly. My last contract was for SLS and the company uses CATIA V5 R21 extensively with PLM (which is not my cup of tea).

First and VERY important: in Aerospace SECURITY is taken very very very seriously, every software that is ‘on the cloud’ i.e. not solidly in their servers is NOT available and will NEVER be for security reasons. This is also the case in NASA.
That is a big problem because a lot of the good new CAD and the awesome features are out of the picture.
The big Aerospace, and yes… jobs post reflects that, use mostly but not exclusively: CATIA (V5 yes NOT V6), NX and CREO ( do not know if SpaceClaim is used very much).
They make deals for licenses and they assign a license to your computer.

For a student (my son is graduating in May BSc ME and will work in Aerospace probably (currently in high tech), he has develop his design skills in SW, but he will be an analyst in Control… so CAD is not that important.

For a ME Design Engineer, I would recommend to make sure that whatever you learn you approach it as “learning the process” of creating geometry… as in the end most CAD are structured to do that and generally follow similar steps.

Mostly Good Luck and enjoy the hard effort of engineering.